British censorship of the internet is greater than we suspected

A few days ago I informed the controversial British Prime Minister David Cameron about the censorship of pornographic content on the internet. However, it turns out that special filters will limit not only what was officially announced, but also many other content.

As reported by Torrentfreak, the idea of ​​a British Prime Minister has a second bottom and implies a much wider scope of internet control than official assurances. I will remind you that it is officially the filtering of pornographic content that will be mandatory by any internet provider. What is worse, filters will not be completely shut down, because although theoretically, at the user’s request, the operator can deactivate them, but only temporarily, because they are starting to work again after some time.

Fighting with similar ideas, the Open Rights Group found, however, that it was not just censorship of pornography. Representatives of the organization cut off a chat with one of the Internet providers who highlighted Cameron’s plan. It turns out that the list of pages and content to be blocked by default does not end with pornography, as shown in the screenshot below.

As you can see, in the filter menu, there are gambling sites; dating sites; Social networks; Games services; File-sharing sites; Promoting drugs, alcohol and cigarettes; As well as treating weapons and violence.

Let’s keep in mind that the filters for all these sites are set to standard, so you might be thinking that if a British citizen wishes to unlock access to a file sharing site or promote suicide or violence, it will immediately be targeted to the appropriate services. You can speak of total citizen surveillance.

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When the new proposal is put into effect, as I will recall, will be at the end of this year, you can expect a significant increase in the popularity of paid VPNs. At least until they are blocked.

Now we at least know why our MPs were interested in the British idea.

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